Book Review: The Girl With the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

Rating: 5 out of 5.

14-year old Adunni is the star of the show in this book and Daré has truly achieved a wonderfully compelling character with a powerful voice.

This is the story of a young girl growing up in Nigeria, full of dreams and ambition, but held back by the societal expectations of her friends and family, as she determinedly quests for her education and a “louding voice”. Beautifully written in a colloquial voice, it is a brilliantly powerful book that engages the hardships of Adunni’s life in contrast with her upbeat and inspiring personality – a definite recommend!

I want a louding voice. I want to enter a room and people will hear me even before I open my mouth to be speaking.

Abi Daré

After the death of her mother, Adunni’s deadbeat father, desperate for food and money, pulls her out of school and sells her to one of the older men in the village to become his third wife, for a bride price of four goats, two bags of rice, some chickens and a new TV. When Adunni escapes, desperate to resume her education and become a teacher, she finds herself trapped in servitude to an unforgiving mistress.

This is a moving story that will sweep you up into Nigeria – from the remote villages to the heart of Lagos. It is a story that will break your heart and put fire in your belly, as you won’t be able to resist Adunni’s optimistic influence. Daré has done a wonderful job of representing girls who have had their voices dimmed by poverty, lack of opportunity and exploitation. A truly inspiring read!

You can buy a copy of The Girl With the Louding Voice from your local independent bookshop through Hive here!



Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo

Book Review: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo

This wonderful novel spans generations and combines the power of 12 startling voices to share the experiences of British women of color. Mainly set in London we hear the story of a proud black lesbian playwright, her sassy super-feminist daughter and a sexually fluid millennial, just to name a couple.

Black History Month Reads

It’s Black History Month in the UK and I decided this year I should finally get round to reading some of those incredible stories that I haven’t quite made time for yet.

One Day by David Nicholls

Book Review: One Day by David Nicholls

I can definitely see why this books is a bit love it or hate it. The story of Dexter and Em is given to us in snapshots, Starting from their meeting at uni up to their late 30s, the book oozes sexual tension, but with an increasingly dark edge which reminded me of Sally Rooney’s novels.

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